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It was interesting to see Easy from Private Webster’s point-of-view. His open-mouthed wonder, his violet eyes, is so unique and definitive. And his journey of acceptance was nice to see. I love how they emphasize silently what I had read from the book — how dirty and tired are the veterans of Bastogne, versus the clean naivete of the Lieutenant Jones and, to some extent, Webster.

And to see Malarkey so tired and serious. Where is the bubbly boy who ran for a Luger under gunfire on D-Day? The sweeping joy on the stolen motorbike, when he shouted, “It’s good to be alive!”

War.

Poor Malarkey.

Lieutenant Lipton (left) tells Malarkey he’s been assigned to the patrol

Potential spoilers in this paragraph…
And then the way Winters decided to disobey Sink’s order for another patrol. That scene by the river with Nixon and Spiers — you can just see that Winters is holding in his irritation. What subtle and powerful.

Goodness, this is the kind of show you watch over and over again to catch all the meaning. Now I can see the theme: That protocol is not ever better than watching out for your men and adjusting your orders to the best benefit of those precious lives under you. That brotherhood can and will persevere, despite the odds.

What a joy it is to watch this show with my sister. What a joy it is to experience this quality, this slice of life, with my dearest friend.

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